Religious Bitterness Searingly Examined in Minnesota Jewish Theatre’s “Shul” – Marvy & Fuller are Spellbinding

Lavender.png

A central conflict that animates Shul by Sheldon Wolf is between two older members of a synagogue. They are Miriam, a Jewish woman struggling financially, and Golden, a wealthy Jewish man who has swept in out of the blue to wield influence about the fate of the synagogue that she has shaped her life around, but which he dismisses with contempt because of psychic wounds he has or thinks he has suffered because of Judaism as perceived through the lens of his childhood. Golden holds his blanket rejection of religion in a psychic vice grip, but the searing Miriam presses under the surface to expose the shallowness and aridity of what he self-deceptively thinks is an intelligent and enlightened view about that mysterious phenomenon called faith. He is blind to the fact that he actually declared spiritual warfare on Judaism long ago.

Charles numrich & nancy marvy. photo by sarah whiting.

Charles numrich & nancy marvy. photo by sarah whiting.

Nancy Marvy and Nathaniel Fuller are spellbinding in their portrayals. Miriam is nobody’s fool and sees the folly in rejecting time-tested truths out of hand. Golden presents himself as superior, thinking his moral relativism and vain materialism are truer. But Miriam cuts right to his soul, exposing the emptiness there. A dangerous moment of existential truth.

Fuller is stunning as a man who abruptly finds himself looking into the abyss. He fails to perceive that his godlessness, which is in itself a belief system of its own, has become an absolute truth. For a man as old as he is, Golden overplays the simplistic “religion is hypocritical” card far too loosely and petulantly. The glorious Marvy reverberates as a female Moses metaphorically hurling the tablets at the false god of the Golden Calf as she exposes him to himself.

Raye birk and nancy marvy. Photo by sarah whiting.

Raye birk and nancy marvy. Photo by sarah whiting.

Moreover, Miriam is a unique character in contemporary drama. Though we aren’t told where she stands on various political issues, she is an older woman grounded in traditional values. In her case, those values are rooted in Judaism. She is compassionate and flexible but not the obligatory stereotype of a narrow-minded conservative woman. In other words, like all the other Wolf characters, she is a flesh and blood human. Miriam is reminiscent of the Jewish wife in Finn & Lapine’s 1990s masterpiece, Falsettos, played beautifully by Eden Espinosa in it’s recent Broadway revival national tour at the Ordway. Both characters could be genuinely called a term which was bandied about 20 years ago—compassionate conservative.

Acclaimed actor Robert Dorfman has worn the director’s hat for this world premiere production. Clearly he is an actor’s director as every actor in his terrific cast feels the stakes are high right down to the marrow of their bones. Shul involves a group of elderly Jews whose crumbling and poorly funded place of worship and fellowship is dwindling in congregants and which lacks funds for repairs the facility sorely needs. In an American inner city, which has also been crumbling, their Eitz Chaim Synagogue has been the epicenter of their daily lives, and many evenings as well. Will it be sold or will they be compelled to share the space with those of another faith? Tough choices!

Raye Birk endears as a sweet man trapped in nostalgia. Paul Schoenack shines as Friedman, a good-natured man who fears that closure of the shul will mean moving on and moving in with inhospitable relations. Charles Numrich is ecstatically wonderful as Ezra, a wild man figure who sees the hole in the shul ceiling not as a flaw, but a window to G-d in heaven. If you’ve read Robert Bly, you know the type I’m talking about.

The savvy Wolf has captured how today’s volatile economic reality is affecting society across the generations. He contrasts the elders with three younger figures. A vibrant Avi Aharoni as Abe, the shul president, captures the essence of the wiser younger man the elders have entrusted their future to. Think of your favorite nephew. Through Abe we come to understand the real difficulties of trying to maintain a traditional religious institution in a time in which tradition is too often denigrated for no good reason.

charles numrich, avi aharoni, raye birk, nat fuller. photo by sarah whiting.

charles numrich, avi aharoni, raye birk, nat fuller. photo by sarah whiting.

Photo by Sarah Whiting.

Dexieng Yang gives a sharp edged performance as a young Jewish realtor whose seems to be headed down the same materialistic path as Golden. However, her financial paranoia stems from insecurity as opposed to making money her Golden Calf as Golden has done. That said, Wolf might consider writing a sequel about just where her attitudes and values will lead her.

Joher Coleman as a Sikh community representative seeking to buy out or share a religious space with Eitz Chaim, brings a vivid sense of integrity to his role. Of all the characters he is the only one who seems to have a footing in the possibility of a bright future. Will this become a Yamaka v. Turban ordeal or will they work it out? You’ll have to see Shul to find out. Indeed, Shul, whatever your faith is, or even if you don’t have a faith, is a compelling and substantive play about religious issues today.

Michael Hoover’s set exudes a sense of a once lovely building worn away, distressed by the passage of time and water. The shadows of its faded beauty have been artfully realized.

Original Source: https://www.lavendermagazine.com/featured-home-page/religious-bitterness-searingly-examined-in-minnesota-jewish-theatres-shul-marvy-fuller-are-spellbinding/?fbclid=IwAR2O8bp0WPnK_3FxXPnjCm8dzGMzgGLIrR-asvfer95v1qPrp78oI22kAhY

Jew Review: ‘Shul’ Expertly Wrestles With Modern Judaism

Charles Numrich and Nancy Marvy in “Shul” from the Minnesota Jewish Theatre Company. (Photo by Sarah Whiting)

Charles Numrich and Nancy Marvy in “Shul” from the Minnesota Jewish Theatre Company. (Photo by Sarah Whiting)

One of the brilliant parts of Shul at the Minnesota Jewish Theatre Company is that you don’t know what city the play is set in. It’s playing in the cozy confines of the Highland Park Community Center in St. Paul, but it could be in any inner city, anywhere in America. The only setting for the show is the dilapidated inside of Eitz Chaim, the synagogue at the heart of the show that had its world premiere on April 27. It’s the themes that emerge that make it a timeless story built for modern-day Judaism.

Opening night of the show did start on a somewhat somber note, with Artistic Director Barbara Brooks dedicating the show the victims of the Poway, Calif., Chabad shooting earlier that day – six months to the day of the Tree of Life (Eitz Chaim) in Pittsburgh.

But from there, the small-but-mighty cast took over, and first-time director Robert Dorfman – an MJTC acting veteran – brought the struggle that playwright Sheldon Wolf put on the page to life. The shul, like many small inner-city congregations, is left to reckon with its future. Move? Sell? Share space with another religious institution?

Charles Numrich, Avi Aharoni, Raye Birk and Nathaniel Fuller in “Shul” from the Minnesota Jewish Theatre Company. (Photo by Sarah Whiting)

Charles Numrich, Avi Aharoni, Raye Birk and Nathaniel Fuller in “Shul” from the Minnesota Jewish Theatre Company. (Photo by Sarah Whiting)

At the heart of it all, to some degree, is fear of change. The world is changing around the shul, and the characters have all grown up in the neighborhood to watch it happen – for better or worse. Even without seeing anything outside of the walls of Eitz Chaim, the actors vividly describe the crumbling of the neighborhood around them.

Charles Numrich, Avi Aharoni, Raye Birk and Nathaniel Fuller in “Shul” from the Minnesota Jewish Theatre Company. (Photo by Sarah Whiting)

With only eight characters, the interactions have to be crisp, and over the course of the two acts, Nancy Marvy’s Miriam and Raye Birk’s Nate lead the cast through an emotional ride. Nate talks of curling up next to his father under his tallit on the pews, while Miriam talks of the comfort she found at Eitz Chaim in tough times. Ivey Award-winner Charles Numrich brings incredible levity to the show as Ezra, the Yoda-esque wise elder. Avi Aharoni plays Abe, the millennial president of the synagogue (“We had an election. I lost,” he griped), who has the challenging responsibility of ushering his dwindling congregation to a decision they don’t want to have to make.

Dexieng Yang and Jôher Coleman bring wit to Heidi and John – two of the unexpected characters to the show. Nathaniel Fuller’s Golden wears his anger well, and Paul Shoenack’s Friedman is the utility player who brings levity and seriousness.

One of the great debates in the show – and seemingly Judaism itself – is the idea of purpose. What purpose does a crumbling building serve? What purpose do we have in our congregations or our communities? These ideas are wrestled with throughout the show and are well articulated. Hope may be a dangerous thing, as Ezra reminds the congregation, but after all, isn’t hope part of faith?

Although the ending – literally the last thing that happens before cutting to the black – felt somewhat unsatisfying – everything that led to it was wonderfully done. The MJTC is closing its 24th season on a high note.

TCJewfolk.png

Gay African-American Acting Legend Harry Waters Jr.’s Courageous Staging of MN Jewish Theatre’s “Actually” Exposes Formalized Privacy Intrusion

Lavender.png

By John Townsend February 22, 2019

Categories: Arts & CultureFeatured - Home PageOur Scene

Photo courtesy of Sarah Whiting Photographic.

Photo courtesy of Sarah Whiting Photographic.

Playwright Anna Ziegler has boldly and brilliantly entered the arena where university panels coerce young students, still in their formative years, to make incriminating statements, often based on erotophobic and misandrist biases of academic interrogators rather than actuality, against fellow students. It will likely take its place as one of the emblematic plays of our time in the way that classics like Death of a Salesman and The Heidi Chronicles were of theirs.

Minnesota Jewish Theatre Company certainly picked the right man to direct with Harry Waters Jr., who created the role of Belize in the first production of Angels In America and was the star of Penumbra Theatre’s first full-fledged gay play, Stage Directions. Indeed, he was an inspired choice to direct what may be the thorniest play of our time. He’s an actor who has gone where others couldn’t or wouldn’t. And as a director he demonstrates the same quality.

Actually portrays the awkward interactions between two undergraduates who have yet to learn how to read the reality of the unspoken. Therefore, they fall prey to the reductivist legalism of an academic panel whose task it is, not to get at the actual truth of a situation involving the two, but to persecute them even if the charges are distorted or even downright false. Though some will see the panel as favoring Amber, the female student, it actually does its own traumatizing psychic assault on her just as much as it does Tom, the male student. We’re impelled to consider that the trauma inflicted by the panel is far more traumatizing on both than the incident itself and its investigative meddling done in the name of social justice.

Two characters convey the perverse elements of a Kangaroo Court set up against a student where he seems to be guilty until proved innocence. However, innocence is something that this court implicitly and ultimately disallows. They have a script that is to be adhered to by any means necessary. Both students are more than just shamed by that set up, they are seriously damaged  emotionally and quite possibly, professionally. The fact that they’re young college kids of limited experience in the world at large is irrelevant to bureaucratic dictates. As in the Stasi of communist East Germany during the Cold War other students are used to snitch and inform on others.

It’s not typical to speak of design elements near the beginning section of a review, but in this case it serves the spirit of the play so uncannily and hauntingly. Michael Hoover’s set opaquely emanates a touch of the ominous and the neoclassical. Representations of tall, grey, hard appearing pillars coldly overlook the human anguish and cruelty portrayed below. One may be reminded of the drab harshness of Soviet architecture or certain American government architectural examples built after World War II: a kind of postmodernist mutation of Actually’s actual Ivy League setting where the architecture often predates these eras and styles. It’s some of the accomplished Hoover’s best work.

Photo courtesy of Sarah Whiting Photographic.

Photo courtesy of Sarah Whiting Photographic.

Amber (Miriam Schwartz) is white, Jewish and insecure. Tom (JuCoby Johnson) is black and confident. Both performances by these gifted young actors are visceral and absolutely devastating. They probe recesses of the human heart and psyche so deeply that it sometimes feels like we’re going into a sacred private inner realm that no one but the character her—or himself should ever go. At points things said feel like a supplication to God.

Ziegler ingeniously offers the race component in a way that transcends identity politics orthodoxy. Tom can surely be described as an outsider in the Princeton University setting. Like everyone of any race or gender, he is flawed. But Tom has predominantly solid vales and is fundamentally a youth of solid character. Therefore, it’s the content of that character which Johnson exquisitely reveals. He makes Tom a contemporary Everyman.

Adding a tidal wave to the situation is that Tom has gay male friend of color who inflicts something extremely vindictive and inexcusable toward him (and I don’t mean making a mere pass. It’s something truly reprehensible). So as not to reveal what happens, it boils down to what frankly is an issue of covetousness that many of us who are gay or bisexual often fail to self-examine. One might think a gay man would be the very first to speak out against privacy invasion in the name of coerced sexual allegations. Unfortunately and despicably, that’s not the case. This gay male feeds into it.

Ziegler has shrewdly written an indictment of the authoritarianism that has come to grip academic policies on sexual misconduct. By extension, it also pertains to other institutions of business, religion, and government that are following similar strangulating approaches. This groundbreaking playwright also signals that there is indeed a cry of outrage among women about misandry polluting such policies.

Photo courtesy of Sarah Whiting Photographic.

Photo courtesy of Sarah Whiting Photographic.

Aside from fleshing out these combustible concerns so intricately, Ziegler is remarkable in the structure of her two-character play. Actually is heavily comprised of monologues with interactions between the actors. This format is unextraordinary in itself, but the upshot of so many pieces that go this route, as satisfying as they may be, is that the monologues can seem not fully unified with a central theme or psychological arc. They may lead to a very effective conclusion, but they don’t culminate toward something sharper. Actually, however does exactly that. Like a good thriller, you may find yourself on the edge of your seat.

Moreover, the playwright astounds with the facility through which her two characters convey multiplex views and actions of the persons weaving or caught in the web of a corrupt investigation. This is where Ziegler’s mastery and Waters’s penetrating direction lead us to a see a jolting play that rates with the greats.

Note: Celebrated lesbian writer, Camille Paglia, who once made the cover of The Advocate, has written quite thoughtfully on this subject in her recent book, Free Women, Free Men.

Actually
Through Mar. 10
Highland Park Community Center, 1978 Ford Parkway, St. Paul
651-647-4315
mnjewishtheatre.org

Original Source: https://www.lavendermagazine.com/featured-home-page/gay-african-american-acting-legend-harry-waters-jr-s-courageous-staging-of-mn-jewish-theatres-actually-exposes-formalized-privacy-intrusion/

Jew Review: ‘Actually’ At The Minnesota Jewish Theatre Company

TCJewfolk.png

ARTS + CULTURE

Guest Post, Orit Ackerman, February 20, 2019

Actually

Miriam Schwartz as Amber and JuCoby Johnson as Tom in the MJTC show “Actually.” Photo by Sarah Whiting.

Miriam Schwartz as Amber and JuCoby Johnson as Tom in the MJTC show “Actually.” Photo by Sarah Whiting.

I will be the first to admit I am a complete script snob when it comes to theatre. I don’t believe an audience member should have to do any preparation before entering the world of the show, whether it’s an experimental performance piece or classically-done Shakespeare. Presenting the story and its complexities is the job of the playwright, actors, directors and production staff. With the Minnesota Jewish Theatre Company’s new show Actually, this job is done with skill and care by director Harry Waters, Jr. and all those involved in this stunning show.

Amber and Tom are freshmen at Princeton in 2016, trying to figure out what they are doing with their lives. In a sentence, the show is about date rape; but there is no way one sentence can describe this show that hits you in the stomach, the heart, and the head multiple times. A story about two 18-year olds just beginning their adult lives resonated with me, as many of us know age doesn’t always fix our insecurities. In addition to being a show that is very specifically about consent, it is also a show about how we see ourselves. It’s a show about the cycle that gets created when we don’t trust ourselves to be ourselves. How people treat us shapes our behavior, which shapes how we see ourselves. The serious subject of the show was well-balanced with softer, even humorous moments of character memories and musings, allowing us an occasional break from the tension of such a daunting subject. In addition to the expected adult themes, strong language adds an appropriately jolting layer of force to the dialogue.

The show’s energy was electric on Sunday afternoon, the second performance of the four-week run. I can only imagine the previous night’s opening was magical. I have every confidence each performance will equal or exceed the previous. JuCoby Johnson gave Tom a vulnerability rarely allowed to male characters in any medium. It was not just refreshing, but so necessary in our world. He was engaged with the audience to the point where I was sure he was looking right at me several times. Amber, played by Miriam Schwartz, comes across as a stereotypical neurotic Jewish female character. Yet…she was exactly all of us. She just wanted to find herself – to feel comfortable in her own body. The honesty of feeling so unsure of yourself so much of the time was uncomfortably familiar. Schwartz let you see her character’s confidence and confusion, and the complexities that exist when desire is wrapped up in our own insecurities.

While the script and actor choices thrilled me, I was must admit I was less enthusiastic about the set. The performance area at Hillcrest Community Center has its challenges, but after seeing dozens of shows there over the years I wanted something that anchored the show a little bit more in a specific time and space. At the same time, I can recognize the ambiguity of the set works with some of the ambiguity of the show itself. What the set lacked in giving us a specific sense of place and time, the sound design fulfilled while setting the tone for the moment. Tom’s love of music was beautifully highlighted by the show’s score, letting us see its importance in his life.

Actually is the Minnesota Jewish Theatre Company at its finest. The show is beautiful, complicated, and honest. It plays now through March 10 at the Highland Park Community Center in St. Paul. Tickets can be purchased online, or by phone at 651-647-4315.

Original Source: https://tcjewfolk.com/jew-review-actually-at-the-minnesota-jewish-theatre-company/